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    A Tradition Built on Trust and Self-Regulation

    As a dentist here in Ontario, you are part of a long and illustrious tradition that stretches back over more than 140 years. It was on March 4, 1868, that An Act Respecting Dentistry received Royal Assent in the Ontario Legislature. The Act created the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario.
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    1868

    The College presented its first certificate to Thomas Neelands granting him Licentiate of Dental Surgery for the fee of $30 on July 23, 1868.
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    1869

    On October 4, Benson Gilbert become one of the first students to be matriculated from the Royal College, his certificate signed by John O’Donnell. Almost 20 years later, Benson Gilbert would sell his Belleville practice to J.A. Marshall.

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    1869

    In July of 1869 RCDSO opened its first dental school. It was located over the British American Insurance office at the northwest corner of Church and Court streets in Toronto. Just down the street was the two-story fire hall of the First Engine Company of York, instituted in 1826. And at the end of the street stood the old Scottish kirk of St. Andrew’s.

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    1888

    The first graduating class after affiliation with the University of Toronto. These were the first dentists to receive DDS degrees.

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    1889

    Dental students bundle up against the Toronto winter pose for a class picture. The fellow on the extreme right is getting in some extracting practice.
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    1893

    The first woman dentist in Canada was Dr. Caroline Louise Josephine Wells who graduated in 1893 here in Ontario.

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    1896

    The new super Dental School at 93 College Street, just west of Children’s Hospital.

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    1915

    The first military dental clinic in the British Empire operated at Toronto’s Canadian National Exhibition grounds. Volunteers who had their teeth treated were then accepted as fit to serve, as the loss or decay of 10 teeth meant disqualification.